15: The Acceptance of The Mahavihara

WHEN they saw that the elephant’s hall was also too small, the people who had assembled there, full of pious zeal, prepared seats for the theras outside the southern gate, in the pleasant Nandana-garden[1] in the royal park, thickly shaded, cool and covered with verdure. The thera went forth by the south gate and seated himself there. Numbers of women of noble families who came thither sat at the thera’s feet filling the garden. And to them the thera preached the Balapandita-suttanta.[2]A thousand of the women attained to the first stage of salvation. So, there in the grove, evening fell.

Then the theras set forth saying: `We will go hence to the mountain.’ And they told the king, and the king came with all speed. Approaching the thera he said to him: ‘It is evening-time, and the mountain is far away; but here in the Nandana-garden is a pleasant place to rest.’ When they answered: ‘It is not fitting (for us) being too near the city,’ (he said): ‘The Mahamegha-park is neither too far nor too near; pleasant (is it), and water and shade abound there; may it please you to rest there! Thou must turn back, lord!’ Then the thera turned back.

The cetiya (afterwards) built on the spot where he turned back, near the Kadamba-river, is called therefore Nivatta-cetiya.[3]

Southwards from Nandana the lord of chariots himself led the thera to the Mahamegha-park, at the east gate. When the king had bidden them prepare fine beds and chairs in fitting wise, in the pleasant royal dwelling, and had taken leave of the theras, saying: ‘Dwell here in comfort,’ he returned to the city, surrounded by his ministers; but the theras sojourned there that night.

As soon as the morning came, the ruler of the land took flowers and visited the theras, greeting them and offering flowers in homage, and he asked them: `Was (your) rest pleasant? Is the garden fitting (for you)?’

`Pleasant was our rest, O great king, and the garden is fitting for ascetics.’

And he asked (moreover): `Is an arama allowed to the brotherhood, sir?’ `It is allowed,’ replied the thera, who had knowledge of that which is allowed and that which is not allowed. And he related the accepting of the Veluvanarama.[4] When the other heard it, he rejoiced greatly and (all) the people were pleased and joyful.

But the queen Anulä, who had come with five hundred women to greet the theras, attained to the second stage of salvation.[5] And the queen Anula with her five hundred women said to the king: `We would fain receive the pabbajja-ordination, your Majesty.’ The king said to the thera, ‘Bestow ye on them the pabbajja !’ But the thera made answer to the king: ‘It is not allowed (to us), O great king, to bestow the pabbajja on women. But in Pataliputta there lives a nun, my younger sister, known by the name Samghamitta. She, who is ripe in experience, shall come hither bringing with her the southern branch of the great Bodhi-tree of the king of samanas, O king of men, and (bringing) also bhikkhunis renowned (for holiness); to this end send a message to the king my father. When this theri is here she will confer the pabbajja upon these women.’

`It is well,’ said the king, and taking a splendid vase he poured water (in token) of giving, over the hand of the thera Mahinda with the words: ‘This Mahamegha-park do I give to the brotherhood.’

As the water fell on the ground, the great earth quaked. And the protector of the earth asked the (thera): `Wherefore does the earth quake?’ And he replied: `Because the doctrine is (from henceforth) founded in the island.’

The noble (king)[6] offered jasmine-blossoms to the thera, and the thera went to the royal dwelling and scattered eight handfuls of blossoms about the picula-tree[7] standing[8] on the south side of it. And then again the earth quaked and when he was questioned he gave this reason: `Already in the lifetime of three Buddhas there has been here a malaka[9] for carrying out the duties of the brotherhood, O king, and now will it be so once more.’

Northward he went from the royal dwelling to the beautiful bathing-tank, and there also the thera scattered as many blossoms. And then again did the earth quake, and being asked (the thera) gave this reason: `This, O ruler of the earth, will be the tank with the room for warm baths.’[10]

Then the wise (thera) went to the gateway of the same king’s dwelling and did homage to the spot with (the offering of) as many flowers. And here again the earth quaked; and quivering with joy the king asked the reason, and the thera told him the reason: `Here the south branch of the Bodhi-tree of the three Buddhas[11] of our age was planted, when they had brought it hither, O king, and the south branch of the Bodhi-tree of our Tathagata will likewise have its place on this same spot, lord of the earth.’

Then the great thera went to the Mahamucalamalaka and scattered on that spot as many flowers. And then again the earth quaked, and being questioned he told (the king) the reason: `The uposatha-hall of the brotherhood will be here, O lord of the earth.’

Afterwards the wise thera went to the place of the Pañhambamalaka.

A ripe mango-tree, excellent in colour, fragrance and taste and of large size, did the gardener offer to the king, and the king offered the splendid (fruit) to the thera. The thera, bringer of good to mankind, let the king know that he would fain rest seated and forthwith the king had a fine carpet spread. When the thera was seated the king gave him the mango-fruit. When the thera had eaten it he gave the kernel to the king to plant. The king himself planted it there and over it, that it might grow, the thera washed his hands. In that same moment a shoot sprouted forth from the kernel and grew little by little to a tall tree bearing leaves and fruit.

When those who were present with the king beheld this miracle, they stood there doing homage to the thera, their hair raising on end (with amazement).

Now the thera scattered there eight handfuls of flowers and then again the earth quaked. And being asked he gave the reason: `This place will be the place where many gifts shall be distributed, which shall be given to the brotherhood, (the bhikkhus) being assembled together, O ruler of men.’

And he went up to the place where (afterwards) the Catussälä[12] was, and there he scattered as many flowers, and then again did the earth quake. And when the king asked the reason of the earthquake the thera made answer: ‘On the occasion of the receipt of a royal park by the three former Buddhas,[13] on this spot the gifts brought from all parts by the dwellers in the island being laid down, the three Blessed Ones and their communities accepted them. And now again the Catussala will stand here and here will be the refectory of the brotherhood, O lord of men.’

From thence the great thera Mahinda, the friend[14] of the island, knowing what was a fitting place, and what unfitting, went to the spot where the Great thüpa[15] (afterwards) stood.

At that time there was within the enclosure of the royal park a little pond called the Kakudha-pond; at its upper end, on the brink of the water, was a level spot fitting for the thupa.

When the thera went thither they brought the king eight baskets of campaka-flowers.[16] The king offered the campaka-flowers to the thera and the thera did homage to the spot with the campaka-fiowers. And then again the earth quaked, the king asked the reason of the earthquake and the thera gave in due order the reasons for the earthquake.

‘This place, O great king, which has been visited by four Buddhas is worthy of a thupa, to be a blessing and happiness to beings.

‘In our age of the world there lived first[17] the Conqueror Kakusandha, a teacher versed in all truth, compassionate toward all the world. At that time this Mahamegha-grove was known as Mahatittha; the capital called Abhaya lay eastward on the other side of the Kadamba-river,[18] there Abhaya was king. This island then bore the name Ojadipa.

`By (the power of) the demons pestilence arose here among the people. When Kakusandha, who was gifted with the ten powers,[19] knew of this misery, then, to bring it to an end and to achieve the converting of beings and progress of the doctrine in this island, he, urged on by the might of his compassion, came through the air surrounded by forty thousand (disciples) like to him,[20] and stood on the Devakuta-mountain. By the power of the Sambuddha, O great king, the pestilence ceased then here over the whole island.

`Standing there, O king of men, the King of the Wise, the Great Sage, proclaimed his will: “All men in Ojadipa shall see me this day, and if they only desire to come (to me) all men shall draw near to me without trouble and speedily.”

`When the king and the townsfolk saw the Prince of the Wise, shining and making the mountain to shine, they came swiftly thither.

`The people, who were going thither to bring offerings to the devatas, believed the Guide of the World with the brotherhood to be (such) devatäs. And when the king, greatly rejoicing had greeted the King of the Wise, had invited him to a repast and had brought him into the city, the monarch then thinking: “This stately and pleasant place is fitting for the resting-place of the Prince of the Wise, with the brotherhood, and not too small,” made the Sambuddha and the brotherhood sit here on beautiful seats in a fine pavilion raised (by him).

‘When the people in the island saw the Guide of the world with the brotherhood sitting here they brought gifts hither from every side. And the king served the Guide of the World together with the brotherhood with his own food, both hard and soft, and with such (foods) as were brought by sundry other folk.

‘While the Conqueror was seated, after the meal, on this very spot,[21] the king offered him the Mahätitthaka-garden as a precious gift. When the Mahatitthaka-grove, gay with blossoms at an unwonted season, was accepted by the Buddha the great earth quaked. And sitting even here, the Master Preached the doctrine; forty thousand persons attained to the fruit of the path (of salvation).

‘When the Conqueror had stayed the day through in the Mahatittha-grove he went in the evening to that plot of ground which was fitting for the place of the Bodhi-tree, and after he, sitting there, had sunk in deep meditation the Sambuddha, rising from thence again, thought, mindful of the salvation of the island-people: “Bringing the south branch of my Bodhi-tree, the sirisa,[22] with her, the bhikkhuni Rucanada shall come hither with (other) bhikkhunis.”

‘When the theri knew his thought[23] she forthwith took the king of that country[24] with her and went to the tree. Then when the theri of wondrous power had drawn a line with a pencil of red arsenic around the south branch she took the Bodhi-tree thus separated and set it in a golden vase, and this, by her miraculous power she brought hither, O great king, with (company of her) five hundred bhikkhunis, surrounded by the devatas, and she placed it, with its golden vase, in the outstretched right hand of the Sambuddha. The Tathägata received the Bodhi-branch and gave it to the king Abhaya to plant; the lord of the earth planted it in the Mahatittha garden.

‘Then the Sambuddha went northwards from this place, and sitting in the beautiful Sirisamalaka the Tathagata preached the true doctrine to the people. Then, O prince, the conversion of twenty thousand living beings took place.[25] Thereupon the Conqueror went yet further north to that plot of ground where (afterwards) the Thüpäräma[26] stood, and after he, sitting there, had sunk into meditation, the Sambuddha rising from thence again preached the doctrine to those around him, and even at that place did ten thousand living beings attain to the fruit of the path (of salvation).

‘Giving his own holy drinking-vessel for the homage of the people and leaving the bhikkhuni here with her following and also his disciple Mahadeva with a thousand bhikkhus, the Sambuddha went eastward from thence, and standing on the place of the Ratanamala, he delivered exhortations to the people; then rising in the air with the brotherhood the Conqueror returned to Jambudipa.

‘Second[27] in our age of the world was the Lord Konagamana, the all-knowing Teacher, compassionate toward all the world. ‘At that time this Mahamegha-grove was known as Mahänoma, the capital called Vaddhamana, lay to the south. Samiddha was the name of the king of that region then. This island then bore the name Varadipa.

`At that time the misery of drought prevailed here in Varadipa. When the Conqueror Konagamana knew of this misery, then, to bring it to an end, and afterwards to achieve the converting of beings and progress of the doctrine in this island, he, urged on by the might of his compassion, came through the air, surrounded by thirty thousand (disciples) like to himself, and stood upon the Sumanakütaka-mountain. By the power of the Sambuddha the drought came to an end, and from the time that the decline of the doctrine ceased rainfall in due season now began.

`And standing there, O king of men, the King of the Wise, the Great Sage, proclaimed his will: “All men in Varadipa shall see me this day, and if they only desire to come (to me) all men shall draw near to me without trouble and speedily.” ‘When the king and the townsfolk saw the Prince of the Wise, shining and making the mountain to shine, they came swiftly thither.

`The people who were going thither to bring offerings to the devatas believed the Guide of the World with the brotherhood to be (such) devatãs. And when the king, greatly rejoicing, had greeted the King of the Wise, had invited him to a repast, and had brought him to the city, the monarch then thinking: “This stately and pleasant place, is fitting for the resting-place of the Prince of the Wise with the brotherhood and not too small,” made the Sambuddha and the brotherhood sit here on beautiful seats in a fine pavilion raised (by him).

‘When the people of the island saw the Guide of the World with the brotherhood sitting here, they brought gifts hither from every side. And the king served the Guide of the World together with the brotherhood with his own food, both hard and soft, and with such (foods) as were brought by sundry other folk.

`While the Conqueror was sitting, after the meal on this very spot, the king offered him the Mahanoma-garden as a precious gift. And when the Mahanoma-grove, gay with: blossoms at an unwonted season, was accepted by the Buddha the great earth quaked. And sitting even here, the Master preached the doctrine; then thirty thousand persons attained to the fruit of the path (of salvation).

`When the Conqueror had stayed the day through in the Mahanoma-grove, he went in the evening to that plot of ground where the former Bodhi-tree had stood, and after he, sitting there, had sunk in deep meditation, the Sambuddha, rising from thence again, thought, mindful of the salvation of the island-people: “Bringing the south branch of my Bodhi-tree, the udumbara[28] with her, the bhikkhunï Kantakananda shall come hither with (other) bhikkhunis.”

‘When the theri knew his thought she forthwith took the king of that region[29] with her and went to the tree. Then when the theri of wondrous power had drawn a line with a pencil of red arsenic around the south branch, she took the Bodhi-tree thus separated, and set it in a golden vase, and this, by her miraculous power, she brought hither, O great king, with (her company of) five hundred bhikkhunis, surrounded by the devatäs, and she placed it, with its golden vase, in the outstretched right hand of the Sambuddha. The Tathagata received it and gave it to the king Samiddha to plant; the lord of the earth planted it there in the Mahänoma garden.

`Then the Sambuddha went northward from the Sirisamala and preached the doctrine to the people, sitting in the Nagamälaka. When they heard the preaching of the doctrine, O king, the conversion of twenty thousand living beings took place. When he had gone yet further northward to the place where the former Buddha had sat, and after he, sitting there, had sunk into meditation, the Sambuddha, rising from thence again, preached the doctrine to those around him, and even at that place did ten thousand living beings attain to the fruit of the path (of salvation).

‘Giving his girdle as a relic for the homage of the people, and leaving the bhikkhuni here with her following and also his disciple Mahasumba with a thousand bhikkhus, the Sambuddha, standing on this side of the Ratanamäla in the Sudassanamala, delivered exhortations to the people; then rising with the brotherhood into the air, the Conqueror returned to Jambudipa.

‘Third[30] in our age of the world was the Conqueror of the Kassapa clan, the all-knowing Teacher, compassionate toward the whole world.

‘The Mahamegha-grove was called (at that time) Mahasagara; the capital, named Visãla, lay toward the West. Jayanta was the name of the king of that region then, and this isle bore then the name of Mandadipa.

`At that time a hideous and life-destroying war had broken out between king Jayanta and his younger royal brother. When Kassapa, gifted with the ten powers,[31] the Sage, full of compassion, knew how great was the wretchedness caused to beings by this war, then, to bring it to an end and afterwards to achieve the converting of beings and progress of the doctrine in this island, he, urged on by the might of his compassion, came through the air surrounded by twenty thousand (disciples) like to himself, and he stood on the Subhakuta-mountain.

`Standing there, O king of men, the King of the Wise, the Great Sage, proclaimed his will: “All men in Mandadipa shall see me this day; and if they only desire to come (to me) all men shall draw near to me without trouble and speedily.” `When the king and the townsfolk saw the Prince of the Wise, shining and making the mountain to shine, they came swiftly thither. The many people who were coming to the mountain bringing offerings to the devatas, that their own side might win the victory, believed the Guide of the World with the brotherhood to be (such) devatas; and the king and the prince amazed, halted in their battle. When the king, greatly rejoicing, had greeted the King of the Wise, had invited him to a repast and had brought him to the city, the monarch then thinking: “This stately and pleasant place is fitting for the resting-place of the King of the Wise with the brotherhood and not too small,” made the Sambuddha and the brotherhood sit here on beautiful seats in a fine pavilion raised (by him).

`When the people of the island saw the Guide of the `World with the brotherhood sitting here, they brought gifts hither from every side. And the king served the Guide of the World together with the brotherhood with his own food, both hard and soft, and with such (foods) as were brought by sundry other folk.

‘While the Conqueror was sitting, after the meal, on this very spot, the king offered him the Mahasagara-garden as a precious gift. And when the Mahasagara-grove, gay with blossoms at an unwonted season, was accepted by the Buddha, the great earth quaked. And sitting even here, the Master preached the doctrine; then twenty thousand persons attained to the fruit of the path (of salvation).

`When the Blessed One had stayed the day through in the Mahasagara-grove, he went in the evening to that plot of ground where the former Bodhi-trees had stood, and after he, sitting there, had sunk into deep meditation, the Sambuddha, rising from thence again, thought, mindful of the salvation of the island-people, “Bringing the south branch of my Bodhi-tree, the nigrodha,[32] with her, the bhikkhuni Sudhammã shall come now with (other) bhikkhunis.”

`When the theri knew his thought she forthwith took the king[33] of that region with her and went to the tree. Then when the theri of wondrous power had drawn a line with a pencil of red arsenic around the south branch, she took the Bodhi-branch thus separated and set it in a golden vase, and this, by her miraculous power, she brought hither, O great king, with (her company of) five hundred bhikkhunis, surrounded by the devatas; and she placed it with its golden vase, in the out-stretched right hand of the Sambuddha; the Tathagata recieved it and gave it to the king Jayanta to plant; the lord of the earth planted it there in the Mahasagara-garden.

‘Then the Buddha went northward from the Nagamalaka and preached the doctrine to the people seated in the Asokamalaka. When they heard the preaching of the doctrine, O ruler of men, even there the conversion of four thousand living beings took place. When he had then gone yet further northward to the place where the former Buddhas had sat, and after he, sitting there, had sunk into meditation, the Sambuddha, rising from thence again, preached the doctrine to those around him; and even in that place did ten thousand living beings attain to the fruit of the path (of salvation).

`Giving his rain-cloak as a relic for the homage of the people, and leaving the bhikkhuni here with her following, and also his disciple Sabbananda with a thousand bhikkhus, he, standing on this side of the river (and) of the Sudassanamäla in the Somanassamalaka, delivered exhortations to the people; then rising with the brotherhood into the air, the Conqueror returned to Jambudipa.

`Fourth in our age of the world lived the Conqueror Gotama, the teacher, knowing the whole truth, compassionate toward the whole world. When he came hither the first time he drove forth the yakkhas, when he came hither again the second time he subdued the nagas. When, besought by the naga Maniakkhi in Kalyani, he returned the third time, he took his meal there with the brotherhood; and when he had taken his ease[34] in the place where the former Bodhi-trees had stood and in the place here appointed for the thupa and (also) in the place (appointed for the guarding) of those (things) used by him (and left as) relics,[35] and when he had gone to this side of the place where the former Buddhas had stood, the great Sage, the Light of the World, since there were then no human beings in Lankadipa, uttered exhortations to the host of devatas, dwelling in the island, and to the nagas; then rising into the air with the brotherhood the Conqueror returned to Jambudipa.

`Thus was this place, O king, visited by four Buddhas; on this spot, O great king, will the thüpa stand hereafter, with the relic-chamber for a dona[36] of the relics of the Buddha’s body; (it will be) a hundred and twenty cubits[37] high and (will be) known by the name Hemamali.’

Then said the ruler of the earth: `I myself will build it.’ `For thee, O king, are many other tasks to fulfil here. Do thou carry them out; but one descended from thee shall build this (thüpa). A son of thy brother[38] the vice-regent Mahanama, one named Yatthalayakatissa, will hereafter be king, his son will be the king named Gothabhaya; his son will be (the king) named Kakavannatissa; this king’s son, O king, will be the great king named Abhaya, renowned under the title Dutthagamini: he, great in glory, wondrous power and prowess, will build the thupa here.’

Thus spoke the thera, and because of the thera’s words the monarch set up here a pillar of stone, whereon he inscribed these sayings.

And as the great and most wise thera, Mahinda of wondrous power, accepted the pleasant Mahamegha-grove the Tissarama, he, the unshakeable caused the earth to quake in eight places;[39] and when going his round for alms he had entered the city like unto the ocean and had taken his meal in the king’s house, he left the palace, and when, sitting there in the Nandana-grove, he had preached to the people the sutta Aggikkhandhopama[40] and had made a thousand persons partakers in the fruit of the path (of sanctification) he rested (again) in the Mahamegha-grove.

When the thera had eaten on the third day in the king’s house, and sitting in the Nandana-grove had preached the Asivisupama,[41] and had thereby led a thousand persons to conversion, the thera went thence to the Tissäräma.

But the king, who had heard the preaching, seated himself at the thera’s feet and asked: `Does the doctrine of the Conqueror stand, sir?’ `Not yet, O ruler of men, only, O lord of nations, when the boundaries are established[42] here for the uposatha-ceremony and the other acts (of religion), according to the command of the Conqueror, shall the doctrine stand.’

Thus spoke the great thera, and the king answered thus: `I will abide under the Buddha’s command, thou Giver of light! Therefore establish the boundaries with all speed, taking in the city.’ Thus spoke the great king and the thera answered thus: `If it be so, then do thou thyself, lord of the earth, mark out the course of the boundary; we will establish it.’ `It is well,’ said the lord of the earth, and even like the king of the gods leaving the Nandana[43] (garden) he went forth from the Mahameghavanarama into his palace.

When the thera on the fourth day had eaten in the king’s house, he preached, sitting in the Nandana-grove, the Anamatagga-discourse[44] and when he had given there a thousand persons to drink of the draught of immortality, the great thera went to the Mahameghavanarama. But having commanded in the morning to beat the drum and to adorn the splendid city and the road leading to the vihara and all around the vihara, the lord of chariots came upon his car to his äräma, adorned with all his ornaments, together with his ministers and the women of the harem, with chariots troops and beasts for riders,[45] in a mighty train.

When he had here sought out the theras and paid his respects to these to whom respet was due, he ploughed a furrow in a circle, making it to begin near the ford on the Kadamba-river, and ended it when he (again) reached the river.[46]

When he had assigned boundary-marks on the furrow that the king had ploughed and had assigned the boundaries for thirty-two malakas and for the Thuparama, the great thera of lofty wisdom, then fixed the inner boundary-marks likewise according to custom; and thus the ruler (of his senses) did on one and the same day establish all the boundaries. The great earth quaked when the fixing of the boundaries was completed.

When on the fifth day the thera had eaten in the king’s house he preached, sitting in the Nandana-grove, the Khajjaniya-suttanta,[47] to a great multitude of people, and when he had given to drink of the ambrosial draught to a thousand persons there, he rested (again) in the Mahamegha-grove.

When also on the sixth day the thera had eaten in the king’s house he preached, sitting in the Nandana-grove, the Gomayapindi-sutta,[48] and after the wise preacher had thus brought a thousand persons to conversion he rested (again) in the Mahamegha-grove.

When on the seventh day the thera had eaten in the king’s house he preached, sitting in the Nandana-garden, the Dhammacakkappavattana-suttanta,[49] and having brought a thousand persons to conversion he rested (again) in the Mabamegha-grove, when he, the light-giver, had in this wise brought eight thousand five hundred persons to conversion in the space of only seven days.

The Nandana-grove being the place where the holy one had made the true doctrine to shine forth, is called the Jotivana.[50] And in the very first days the king commanded that a pasada be built for the thera in the Tissäräma, and he had the bricks of clay dried speedily with fire. The dwelling-house was dark-coloured and therefore they named it the Kalapasadaparivena.[51]

Then did he set up a building for the great Bodhi-tree, the Lohapasada,[52] a salaka-house,[53] and a seemly refectory. He built many parivenas in an excellent manner, and bathing-tanks and buildings for repose, by night and by day, and so forth. The parivena on the brink of the bathing-tank (which was allotted) to the blameless (thera) is called the Sunhätaparivena.[54] The parivena on the spot where the excellent Light of the Island used to walk up and down is called Dighacañkamana.[55] But the parivena which was built where he had sat sunk in the meditation[56] that brings the highest bliss is called from this the Phalagga-parivena.[57] The (parivena built there) where the thera had seated himself leaning against a support is called from this the Therapassaya-parivena.[58] The (parivena built) where many hosts of gods had sought him out and sat at his feet is therefore called the Marugana-parivena.[59] The commander of the king’s troops, Dighasandana, built a little pasada for the thera with eight great pillars. This famed parivena, the home of renowned men,[60] is called the Dighasandasenapati-parivena.

The wise king, whose name contains the words `beloved of the gods’, patronizing the great thera Mahinda, of spotless mind, first built here in Lanka this Mahävihära.[61]

Here ends the fifteenth chapter, called `The Acceptance of the Mahavihara’, in the Mahavamsa, compiled for the serene joy and emotion of the pious.

  1. 1-See note to 11.2. [^]
  2. 2-I. e. ‘the discourse of the fool and the wise man.’ Probably the suttanta S. II, pp. 23-25, or perhaps A. I, 101-105. [^]
  3. 3-I.e. the turning-back cetiya. The thupa was probably not far from the Pathamacetiya. See note to 14. 45. [^]
  4. 4-The Veluvana ‘Bamboo-grove’ near Rajagaha was a present of the Magadha-king Bimbisara to the Buddha. M.V. I. 22. 17-18 (= Vin. Pit. i, p. 39, S.B.E. xiii, p. 143) ; Jat. i, p. 85, 1 foll. [^]
  5. 5-I.e. the sakadagamiphala. A sakadagami is one who will only once be reborn in the world of men before attaining to nibbana. [^]
  6. 6-A play on the words jatimant ‘of high birth’ (jati), and jati ‘the great flowered jasmine ‘. [^]
  7. 7-Tamarix Indica. [^]
  8. 8-I would prefer the reading thite agreeing with picule instead of thito. Certainly B2 is the only one in the collated MSS. that has this reading, but it is supported by the Tika. [^]
  9. 9-Malaka is a space marked off and usually terraced, within which sacred functions were carried out. In the Mahavihara (Tissarama) at Anuradhapura there were 32 malakas. Dip. 14. 78; Mah. 15. 192. The sacred Bodhi-tree for instance was surrounded by a malaka. [^]
  10. 10-On the jantaghara (‘a bathing-place for hot sitting-baths’, S.B.E. xiii, p. 157, n. 2) see M.V. I. 25. 12-13; C.V. V. 14. 3 foll.; VIII. 8. 1 foll. [^]
  11. 11-The three Buddhas who preceded the historical Buddha in the present age of the world (kappa, lasting many millions of years), are named Kakusandha, Konagamana and Kassapa. According to the legend they all, like Gotama, visited Ceylon and the events always followed the same course. GEIGER, Dipavamsa and Mahavamsa, p. 8 foll., and Mah. 15. 57 foll. [^]
  12. 12-I. e. a quadrangular hall which served as a refectory for the monks. [^]
  13. 13-See note to 15. 34. [^]
  14. 14-Dipavaddhana, lit. furtherer, increaser of the island. [^]
  15. 15-I. e. the Ruwanwaeli-dagaba = pali Hemamali, see 15. 167. [^]
  16. 16-Michelia Champaka, Lin., belonging to the Magnoliaceae. [^]
  17. 17-Cf. 15. 91 foll., and 125 foll. [^]
  18. 18-I now prefer to refer Kadambanadiya pare to the preceding phrase, therefore Mah. ed. the comma after ahu (58 d.) should be deleted and placed after pare (59 a). [^]
  19. 19-See note to 3. 6. [^]
  20. 20-Tadi, i.e. like him, blessed like (the Buddha) himself; by extension, a synonym of araha. Cf. Therag. 62, 205, 206; Suttanip. 86, 957, &c. [^]
  21. 21-Idheva, that is, ‘here, just where we now are.’ [^]
  22. 22-Acacia Sirissa. [^]
  23. 23-By means of her omniscience. [^]
  24. 24-According to the Tika king Khema of Khemavati (in Jambudipa). See Buddhavamsa (ed. MORRIS, P.T.S. 1882) XXIII. 8. [^]
  25. 25-See note to 1. 32. [^]
  26. 26-See below, note to 17. 30. [^]
  27. 27-Cf. 15. 57 foll., and 15. 125 foll. [^]
  28. 28-Ficus glomerata. [^]
  29. 29-According to the Tika king Sobhana (Buddhavamsa XXIV. 16 :Sobha) in the city Sobhavati. [^]
  30. 30-Cf. 15. 57 foll., and 91 foll. [^]
  31. 31-See note to 3. 6. [^]
  32. 32-Ficus Indica, the banyan-tree. [^]
  33. 33-According to the Tika king Kiki in the city of Baranasi (Benares). See Buddhavamsa XXV.33 ; Therigatha, Comm.(Paramatthadipani V), p. 1727, &c. [^]
  34. 34-Lit. ‘ when he had enjoyed by sitting down (in meditation) the place, &c.’ [^]
  35. 35-Cf. 15, 88. 122, 157. Paribhogadhatu is a relic consisting of something used by the dead Saint, in opposition to sariradhatu ‘body-relic’, i. e. remains of his body. [^]
  36. 36-A certain measure of capacity. See CHILDEKS, P.D., s. v. [^]
  37. 37-According to the Abhidhanappadipika a ratana or hattha is equal to 2 vidatthi (=8 1/2 – 9 inches). See RHYS DAVIDS, Ancient Coins and Measures of Ceylon, p. 15. The total height of the thupa would accordingly be nearly 180 feet. This is exactly the height of the main body of the Ruwanwaeli-dagaba without the ‘ tee ‘. SMITHER, Architectural Remains, Anuradhapura, p. 27 and Plate XXIV. [^]
  38. 38-Cf. 22. 1 foll. [^]
  39. 39-Cf. 15. 25, 28, 31, 33, 37, 45, 47, 55. [^]
  40. 40-Cf. note to 12. 34. [^]
  41. 41-See the note to 12. 26. [^]
  42. 42-Cf. note to 14. 32. [^]
  43. 43-Nandana or Nanda (see 31. 44) is the name of a pleasure-garden in Indra’s heaven. [^]
  44. 44-Note to 12. 31. [^]
  45. 45-The Tika explains sayoggabalavahano so: ettha yoggam ti rathasakatadi, balam ti sena, vahane ti hatthiassadi. Cf. 25. 1. [^]
  46. 46-On this verse cf. Mah. ed., p. xxxvi. The ford of the Kadamba-river from which the boundary line starts and to which it returns is called in the Tika Gangalatittha. Instead of the one verse 191 the Sinhalese MSS. have, in all, twenty verses which describe how the king himself guides the plough and in which the different areas marked off are designated. The passage is a later interpolation, drawn chiefly from a Simakatha of the Mahavihara. [^]
  47. 47-The Khajjaniyavagga from S. Ill, pp. 81-104. Specially, perhaps, the Sihasuttanta (XXII. 79) on pp. 86-91. [^]
  48. 48-I.e. ‘the discourse on the clod of cow-dung.’ S. Ill, p. 143 foll. [^]
  49. 49-Cf. note to 12. 41. [^]
  50. 50-I. e. ‘Grove of light.’ [^]
  51. 51-I.e. ‘Cell of the black house.’ On pasada see note to 27. 14. [^]
  52. 52-We have here apparently a tradition according to which the Lohapasada was built by Devanampiyatissa and not first erected by Dutthagamani. The Tika explains the passage in this way that Dutthagamani built his ‘House of Bronze’ when the old one had been removed. [^]
  53. 53-Food, given as a present to the monastery collectively, is distributed to the monks by tickets or orders called salaka (‘slip’ of wood, bark, &c.). The building where the distribution takes place, is the salakagga ‘salaka-house.’ GUILDERS, P.D., s. v. salaka. [^]
  54. 54-I. e. the cell of him who is well-bathed or purified. The nahatapapo ‘who has washed away the evil’ is Mahinda, as also is the dipadipo in 208. [^]
  55. 55-I. e. the long walk or the long hall for walking. See note to 5. 226. [^]
  56. 56-On the eight samapatti, i.e. the states of trance reached by samadhi ‘meditation’, see KERN, Manual, p. 57. [^]
  57. 57-I. e. cell of the highest reward. [^]
  58. 58-I. e. cell of the thera’s support. [^]
  59. 59-I. e. cell of the hosts of gods. [^]
  60. 60-On this allusion to the author of the Mahavamsa, Mahanama, see GEIGER, Dip. and Mah. (English ed.), p. 41. [^]
  61. 61-Mahavihara, ‘the great monastery,’ is henceforth the name for the Mahameghavanarama. [^]
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